Never, ever kiss the girl

A social-justice worrier has her BVDs knotted because the Princeton men’s a cappella singers, the Tigertones, keep singing “Kiss the Girl” without her consent:

No matter how “great the tradition,” this canonical Tigertones tune should be struck from their repertoire. Its lyrics raise some serious issues. The premise of the song, originally sung in the Disney film The Little Mermaid, is that the male Prince Eric, on a date with the beautiful female Ariel, should kiss her without asking for a single word to affirm her consent. Despite the fact that an evil sea-witch cursed Ariel’s voice away, making verbal consent impossible, the song is clearly problematic from the get-go.

I can see where this girl is headed: thirty-one instead of twenty-nine.

Says Fausta:

It angers me that a natural impulse to kiss an attractive member of the opposite sex is condemned as “toxic masculinity,” a sophomoric opinion coming from an actual sophomore who, by doing so, is engaging in toxic feminism … with the support of the University.

Most of all, I grieve over the sad barren emotional lives of the young SJW generation. Very, very few experiences in life are as great as a welcome passionate kiss from the guy, especially if it’s unexpected. Denying yourself a rich emotional experience under the guise of … what? … a neopuritanical rejection of the “romantic and sexual liberties taken by men” is not only what Rosalind Russell must have had in mind when she said, “Yes! Life is a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!”

There are people who prefer kale to a bacon cheeseburger. It’s pretty much useless to try to change their minds.

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One thought on “Never, ever kiss the girl

  1. fillyjonk says:

    This girl (or, I guess, at this point, woman) would like to give blanket permission to be kissed, provided it’s in a non-creepy way (NO TONGUE). A peck on the cheek gets a blanket OK from me.

    Is that okay? Would people be OK with that?

    The last guy who felt empowered to kiss me (on the cheek) was one who, as we used to say “bats for the other team.” I suppose he figured there’d be no way anyone could bring charges of “toxic masculinity” against him.

    Like

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